Neglected Tropical Diseases in a First-World Country?

February 13th, 2014 in New Science with 2 Comments

NDTs

[Featured image courtesy of Lindsey Wheeler via End the Neglect

I teach an epidemiology course to undergraduates.  I have long talked about the" third-world country within our first-country world" where health is concerned.  Well, it has recently become more real that I had even imagined. I've been following Peter Hotez on Twitter.  He is the founding dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine, and holds the Texas Children's Hospital Endowed Chair in Tropical Pediatrics.  He's got a lot to tell us about NTDs - neglected tropical diseases - which are surprisingly common in this country.  His article, "Twin Pillars of Poverty in Black America:  NDTs and Incarceration" sheds light on diseases associated with poverty that can actually cause poverty.  Some of the NDTs he highlights among African Americans are toxocariasis, trichomoniasis, congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV), and dengue.  

Hotez

[Peter Hotez, courtesy the Sabin Vaccine Institute

 

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Kelly Cowan

About Kelly Cowan

I’m a mom, teacher, scientist, author and community activist. I work at an open-admissions regional campus of a midwestern university, where I teach microbiology and epidemiology to a lot of pre-health professions students and a few poets and business majors.

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2 Responses

  1. Eli says:

    Dr. Hotez is at the school Baylor College of Medicine (no association with Baylor University).

  2. Kelly Cowan Kelly Cowan says:

    Eli,
    Thanks for pointing that out. It’s been fixed.

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